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. it is important for us to understand what the cbos are doing. it is important for them to have specific training for their individuals. they should also have some guidelines and some criteria to evaluate their successes, on a quarterly and yearly basis. >> thank you. last question. what are the types of job opportunities that are available for at risk youth? what are the funding opportunities? >> there are not many job opportunities right now. with the way that funding is currently, it is only being reduced. what we try to do is think creative. we try to create an internship programs, where we try to confuse -- infuse youth. we utilize a lot of non-western ways of trying to have youth identified. we infuse political education so they can make a good choice. there are other programs like oasis. there are not many opportunities, not everybody could work -- all the work permits required. it also requires a social security number. alternative pathways are a good way to go, such as those internship opportunities. use these venues as an opportunity to have kids reflect and make positive choices by lea
us today. [applause] throughout our history, safety and security has always been our priority. safety and security of our passengers, and safety of our employees. we are building on that commitment by commissioning what is the first fire rescue boat house facility on the west coast of the united states. more simply -- [airplane noise] we are at an airport. this is the first marine emergency response facility on the west coast. more simply, we can call it the first fireboat house at an airport. it is a core value for the airport team that we have worked together to provide an exceptional airport, that we are innovating, and that we work in partnership. this is a partnership between the fire department and the airport. great project work by airport staff and the division of design and construction, who designed this building. the engineering staff support to the work. the architectural team and the design and construction staff -- i would like to recognize all the staff involved in the successful project. [applause] completed on budget, and one month ahead of schedule. we have an outsta
for this project. this hearing again gives us the opportunity to hear about one of the two top issues of concerns for constituents in the south beach rincon hill and mission bay neighborhood. the first that we occurred was transportation. this area is already a neighborhood that is quite impacted by the regular traffic of workers and commuters onto the bay bridge as well as the 2 80. we have a lot of questions in terms of what this new arena -- what is really the assessed impact that we believe might occur and what types of investments do we as a city need to make to address the demands. we have some of the highest collisions between pedestrians and vehicleses in the south of market. so, how will this project impact those rates? second, we asked questions whether we can support bike infrastructure in that neighborhood to increase bike circulation so folks can bike to and [speaker not understood]. third, we have questions about what public transit investment costs are and to meet the demands of additional gains in this neighborhood. we've already seen what muni has been able to do with giants home
of the "huffington post." thanks for joining us. >> thank you formation me un. >> eliot: polling is more than picking up the phone, calling 12 random people and adding up who said what? >> increasingly, when i started in this business 25 years ago you could do something like that. you could get a scientifically random sample, a few reasonable steps to make it rigorous and not have to do a whole lot of waiting or adjustment afterwards. now there have been a combination of things. lower response rates the whole cell phone problem basically two-thirds of us have two kinds of phones. another third roughly have a cell phone only, and it's a whole lot harder to know what the odds are getting someone over one phone or another. pollsters are having to make a lot of assumptions one way or another about either about the demographics of who they interview or the mechanism that they use to select it. >> eliot: i want to break this down a little bit. the moment you talk about waiting some answers more than others you're putting into play an opportunity for the pollster to exercise discretion that may be correct o
these wonderful advance there is was no backlash. the republicans didn't use this as a wedge issue. they didn't run ads on it. they didn't bring it up at the debate. there was silence. it means that we as gay americans, we're wedge no more. >> eliot: expanding rights for gays and lesbians, and now it's the ballot box where the public by majority vote say we're believe in this conception of civil rights. it's a fundamental and very historic wonderful thing to see. there is this gaping hole in federal law. explain why it is still there and what we wanted to do about it. >> congress for many years have been dragging its feet on a very simple bill to bandies crime ban ban discriminating for being gay. we expect real progress now that president obama has been reelected in terms of an executive order that will ban the companies that profit from federal contracts. that's almost one in four jobs in america. this will be a huge step forward and we're expecting it pretty soon. >> eliot: now just so people can understand many states have passed laws that extend the rights that we're talking about. but
father want the us to have an education. we knew that education was to a better life. i think he taught all of us would come back home and try to work from there. >>> you with catch this and overprograms online at booktv.org. >>> in an interview conducted on the campus of george mason university during the fall for the book festival. in the book she shares her experience with growing up in mexico without her parents. who immigrate to the united states illegally to find work. this is about half an hour. >> what is -- [inaudible] >> the way u grew up knowing it was it was the reference to the united states, but to me because i grew up in the hometown surrounded by mountains, i didn't know where the united states was to me it was the other side of the mountain. during the time my parents were gone, working here in the u.s. i will look at the mountain something i parents were over there on the other side of the mountains. that was what it meant to me. >> where did you grow up? originally where were u born. >> in mexico. southern mexico in the little city that nobody has heard of. why mentio
to figure this out. either sfpd or everyone involved, it will not have black towne cars using that road, have to have other access. we have buses with people holding on. they stand. at the cab driver, it is frustrating. >> herbert weiner. why does muni have such a crime rate? because it gets away with murder. [indiscernible] requires physically disabled people to walk quarter of a mile. they ignore the obvious. more buses, more drivers. they propose extravagant solutions. mta is a bully agency the tax taxidrivers, parking meters in the physically frail. if muni passengers a lucky those taking the bus today are lucky if they are home by christmas. i had to acquaint this board with muni etiquette. when you say to someone i will see you in hell, it means i will see you in a muni bus. >> chairman nolan: next speaker plesae. >> commissioners thank you for letting me speak again. of the record i'm emile lawrence [sounds like]. i want to see what we see the mta is missing by a long mile. technology is superseding your medallions. if you look at the industry in london, they have to sepa
the negotiations. she did not meet with hamas leaders because the u.s. does not deal directly with the militant group. so gint acted as a go-between. today, second clinton announced they had a deal. >> the united states will with partners across the region to consolidate this progress, improve conditions for the people of gaza, provide security for the people of israel. >> tonight, israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu says he will consider more severe military action if the cease-fire does not last. we have team fox coverage. david lee miller live inside southern israel but first to steve harrigan. he is live tonight in caro. what are the terms of the deal exactly? >> trace, three basic points coming out of this cease-fire agreement. first a cessation of hostilities on all sides. for israel that means they will no longer target members of hamas. for hamas it means they will no longer fire rockets into israel. second. a cooling off period of 24 hours. this will be a closely watch period to see whether this 8 days of violence has actually stopped. and finally the most controversial part, an
we handle drug enforcement here in california is in effect a war on crumbs instead of the often used phrase on drugs. how do you respond to his remarks? >> well, i think the first thing that we have to recognize is that the majority of people who are caught up in the criminal justice system and who are prosecuted for this type of offense for possession offenses and to some degree possession for sale offenses, the vast majority are indigent people and the vast majority of those indigent people are people of color. so what you have are two systems in place. you have a system where privileged white middle class people basically use drugs, college campuses, frat parties, not clubs, they use drug with impunity, they don't have to worry about being caught. then you have a system that comes down like a ton of bricks on indigent poor people and that's one of the reasons why i think this type of reform is a positive first step because if you aren't going to make drug possession illegal, at least make it a misdemeanor and not a felony. at least don't stigmatize and label an entire population o
about next year. this gives us plenty time what water taxis mean by the time it is open in 2017, 2018. >> thank you. i just want to say i think this is a truly critical part of this development as we move forward and i appreciate the work that is happening in this area. i know that supervisor wiener has some questions, but i just want to make sure that we continue to look at this, one of the top concerns of course are we going to be able to [speaker not understood] to meet this need and how do we serve it, but also not impact other parts of the city as well. and then how can we also enhance some of the existing issues that already exist in the neighborhood even without the warriors arena that have safety issues, the bike access as well as other public transit. you i really look forward to working with you and the mta as we move forward with this. i believe supervisor wiener has questions as well. * >> thank you, mr. chairman. thank you for that presentation, mr. albert. very much appreciate it. the plan seems like solid in many ways but in the linchpin to all of this is muni. i'm hope
provided in the approval for the use for this very type of pilot, that in fact it was found the funding at the request of someone in fact commissioner tiny of marin, so that this kind of a pilot that we're talking about could be funded with this money. so the idea that was put out there, that somehow this is not what this funding was intended for, respectfully is not happened at the mtc. but the main point that i want to make is this. you know, i don't know that anyone herei0÷s=úÑ questions the importance of investing in the maintenance of muni, and improving the reliability of the system, and making sure that we have a system that works for every rider. but the notion that we have to choose between that and actually making public transit affordable to low income kids, to me, is a false choice. the two are not mutually exclusive. in fact, as mr. reiskin himself noted during the hearing, and as was noted during the presentation of the tpi funding, the money that has been allocated for san francisco, it's money that can be used for different things. and the fact that the mta board of d
troubles. >> we brought the butterball turkey hot line right here into our sued yo. >> you can e-mail us your turkey questions. e-mail us at friendsfirst@foxnews.com or tweet us at fox friends first. >> we have the master butcher. he is showing us how to properly carve our turkey this year. >> it smells good. >> it does. thanksgiving is a lot more than food. >> as we all know the holidays can be stressful and hard at times. that brings us to our brew own this question of the day. we have a special guest helping us out. dr dr. keith ablow. >> he is going to help us survive the family drama. >> you can tweet us at fox friends first or e-mail at friendsfirst@foxnews.com. keith ablow will be here to help us answer those questions. >> the top five stories making news at this hour. the search for a serial killer is now over. police raying and charging a staten island sales man who is caught on video at the crime scene. spent 24-hours being questioned finally cracked and confessed. he knew all three of his victims and might have been planning to strike again. they found this gun in his bag whic
us. and so, i think that once again, i go back to the fact that under the current system, because we have so many of those individuals who were once incarcerated at the state level, being pushed down to the counties, there's no room at the end in terms of the county jails. so misdemeanors aren't going to be sentenced to county jail but will be sentenced in community service or whatever. and for those individuals who do need some measure of control and supervision to deal about -- deal with their conviction problems, it's not going to happen at the misdemeanor level. >> let me go to a couple of the questions from the audience. i've shared them with our district attorney. george, two questions there, one related to whether or not drug possession should be treated differently for adults than from juveniles. and then a question about back on track, whether or not that program would be positively or adversely affected by senator leno's proposal. >> yes, let me start with the first question concerning juveniles. i think juveniles definitely need to be treated differently, and certainly her
. a lot of students inform us they cannot use their tuition fees or tuition things to housing. they actually still have to get a job. so, there is a need for affordable housing for families, students, seniors and everyone. therefore, that's why we worked diligently with our allies and you supervisors to ensure that we have a cap to really see and analyze that this is a need. and we really appreciate you hearing our concerns and we look forward to working with the planning staff to actually look over those analysis. thank you again and we hope to -- that you support this legislation. >> thank you. i don't have any other cards. so, if anyone after mr. cohen is interested in speaking, you can just go ahead and line up. >>> good afternoon, supervisors. tim cohen on behalf of the housing action coalition. i'd like to support the proposed legislation for new housing product efficiency dwelling units with one important exception. we have said repeatedly that edus are a logical necessary response for badly needed new housing in an extremely expensive housing market. edus have long bee
's wrong with that? [ticking] >> when the u.s. oil companies came here in the '40s and '50s, the americans moved into the area with their families and developed it to suit their tastes and their way of life. they created a replica of american suburbia. today you could be in the outskirts of houston or los angeles. it's almost like it's an enclave within saudi arabia. it's--different from the rest of the country. >> yes, that's true, because-- >> very different. it kept a lot of the american ways. >> yes, of course. >> but blocked off from the rest. >> they are good ways. there's nothing wrong with it. these were their excellent ways. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm morley safer. in this edition, we follow the flow of big oil from massive, mega billion dollar oil fields in saudi arabia to the u.s. where wall street refines the oil into a mega billion dollar commodity. we begin with a look back to 2008 when the price of oil, theoretically tied to supply and demand, suddenly became untethered. storage tanks were full, yet the price skyrocketed from $69 a barrel to nearly $150 before it
the carnage. we'll have our coverage of the cease-fire with arwa damon, who's live this morning for us in gaza. and arwa, we see the flags flying, the honking, the streets lined with cars. is it still the same situation right now? >> reporter: it most certainly is. we can give you an idea of what the street below us looks like, as masses of people following thursday midday prayers here are gathering in front of one of the government buildings. we've been hearing the speeches, listening to the messages coming from the loud speakers as well. people very much declaring this a victory, although this is a city and a population that most certainly has paid an incredibly heavy price. just to give you an idea, next to where the crowds are gathering down this main road in gaza city are the remains of what was once a residential home that was attacked a few days ago. we were here when that strike took place. it was massive. it shook the entire neighborhood. and so whilst on the one hand people are celebrating, they are saying that this was a victory for hamas, for the palestinians, that they did manage
you. you have done a great job in bringing us to this point and i look forward to your leadership going forward. this is to extend the deadline. that's all. a motion and second. do we have people who want to speak in moving the deadline? >> good afternoon. -- malik again, long-time driver. moving the deadline is fine with me. directors, you missed me by this much, to accommodate drivers like me you need to increase the number to 350. my position is 542. i have been driving for 24 years continuously. on the list 14 years,thank you for the years of my service, that is not enough for my family. -- i was promised a peak-time medallion. in the end they missed the again. why am i being so hated? what am i doing wrong here? why am i not heard? it's not fair! i protest! i protest! i protest. you forsake me. you pushed me against the wall to take legal action against youand sfmta staff. if i have to do it alone, i'm going to do it. >> the meeting will come to order. good afternoon, everyone. it's monday, november 19, 2012. this is the land use and economic development committee of the s
down the hallway to use the rest room. [speaker not understood]. he's got cameras in the hallways. we see someone walking down the hallway. you have to get out of there. why is that? you walked down the hallway. i do not remember hearing that against the law. you cannot walk down the hallway. i don't remember reading that anywhere, okay. unless there is some secret code that i'm not aware of. and any time we approach the management with negotiations, they either blatantly lie to us or they turn a deaf ear. i've been waiting six months for a phone jack. i could have built a phone by then, okay. these are the problems we're experiencing. i gave up on the phone jack. am i supposed to wait another six months? i could have called mars by now. it's ridiculous. i could have contacted a space shuttle by now, okay. with the phone jack [speaker not understood]. the tenants do not exist unless it's check day. that's what i'm trying to say. it's like this magic trick they play on the first. we exist momentarily to pay rent, then poof, we disappear again. >> thank you, sir. >> thank you. >>> thank
for those poor little whatevers that are difrplt than us, but we are all equal. the third one is working together and i think about the giants, we're all for the team, not all together not as if we are color blind and color doesn't exist but with our diversity. the fourth is with power and authority, the person who stands up and says this is what needs to happen, like a school principal who says we're not going to let kids go around the school saying that's okay, all these things are needed. >> i like that, that's great. something that really resonated with me that tom said, if you simply tolerate diversity you are aspiring to mediocrity. can you talk about the ambassadors, adults taking an active role to intervene when we witness bullying. >> all of us are humbled by the virus, how systemic it's become. how do you get your hands around that? for me it's top down and bottom up. we are authority figures and what we do for our children and that's care, but we need to empower them to become the leaders they are waiting to become. this notion of youth adult partnership is esoteric in its
sedan told us that we are in a fight for our liberty. we hope you have a very happy thanksgiving. good night from new york. tom: thank you for nothing. on this thanksgiving week, unions refusing to give anything up? welcome, i am charles payne in for neil cavuto. two dozen employee unions begging congresso spare them on any deaof the fiscal cliff. this on top of unions everywhere flexing their muscles. airports, retail stores, hospitals. it's time to say this gravy train is over. dave, when you have? reporter: all the excesses of government and the phony rules and regulations and useless rules, these unions thre on that. the postal employees union is extraordinary. federal and postal employees are struggling during these hard times. no other group has been asked to financially contribute in the way that they have. we know that they are making twice as much of a comparable job and the private workforce. >> there is no gravy train left. america it is not in the 50s anymore. companies along the lines of this, they can't handle the higher pay rate. there is no future for private and
.7 million in regional transit performance initiative funding. this funding is to be used for improving reliability. there is no more effectiveádz-zy to chief these goals, this funding should be dedicated 100% to improving muni's deteriorating reliability by purchasing muni vehicles and improving muni's operations. the resolution i sponsored and that is before us today to provides. the mta board of directors is considering a proposal to use a portion of this region a funding not for improving muni's reliability for the youth. i've been public in my skepticism of the free muni for youth program. my skepticism is based on the funding needs and deficit and my belief that the funding will come from muni operating money. worry now seeing that's the case, that muni is considering using some of this maintenance money for the free muni program rather than to invest in the system, purchase vehicles, rehabilitate vehicles, and over-wise make the system more reliable. once a free muni pilot program ends there will be enormous pressure to extend the program and that pressure almost certainly will
things. those are waiting for you now. we are here for you. you can do this. report back and let us know how it went. that does it for us tonight. have a great thanksgiving. we'll see you monday. and repor and let us know how it went. that's it for us. first look is next. >>> this thanksgiving morning, first look, secretary clinton is on her way home after working out a cease-fire in the middle east. will it hold. >>> a new report on general petraeus. we have details. >> we are a few hours away from macy's thanksgiving parade on nbc. good morning to you. i'm veronica de la cruz. >> the streets are clear this morning after the cease-fire went into effect. thousands went into the streets to celebrate the cease-fire. martin fletcher fletcher joins us from tel aviv, israel with the details. martin, good morning. >> reporter: good morning to you. it's all quiet. a couple of sirens went off but no rockets have been fired. so far the cease fire is holding about 14 hours after it went into effect at 9:00 local time last night. there were great celebrations in gaza last night, as you mention
now. - fox and friends begins right now. >> we'll use juliet. >> she does the turkey call. >> 16 years of it >> my kids had their first twinkie they said oh, my goodness. we have missed this. and now they don't want the twirchingy to go away. >> have they tried the zinger. ngood point. >> sorry son it is going away. it is thanksgiving. many of you are getting up my wife is geth house ready for thanksgiving. >> we have mother-in-law. >> had a thanksgiving emergency. cynthia was late, she was really on time. delayed a bit because she had a fire in her oven. she had to call the police and fire department. >> and they - on yeah. >> she put the turkey on before work and boom, the stove goes up. >> it was not like she was going. here i am going to work. here's the turkey. nthis happens. nthere is a lot of issues that come up on this day and that's why we are here for you. prospect of preparing your thanksgiving turkey is worrying you. forenot. we have experts. she has a business card that said that. nicole jobs is here to answer your questions. hi, nicole. better to span the gamit from the r
i'm steve kroft. thanks for joining us. [ticking] [ticking] >> in a nondescript t-shirt at a nondescript desk, mark zuckerberg runs a vast global empire, leading the whole internet in his direction. is the goal for you to conquer the whole internet? to own the internet? >> well, think about it like this. people--if they can use a product of any category--photos, music, tv, anything--either by themselves or with their friends... >> mm-hmm. >> i think most of the time, people want to do those things with their friends, so-- >> so is the answer "yes"? [ticking] you describe bill gates in very harsh terms. um, you've described him as being quite abusive. i mean, it's not a pretty picture. >> and i felt like when i wrote it, i should just tell it like it happened, in an unvarnished way, warts and all. >> you'll hear how the two high school buddies who started microsoft and a computer revolution had some pretty trying times along the way. do you think he came to think that you weren't working as hard as he was and it became a source of resentment with him? >> well, i thi
" starts right now. >>> good evening and thanks for staying with us for the next hour. happy thanksgiving eve. this is one of those days when no news is supposed to happen. but it turns out there is a lot of news today, including a lot of news to be thankful for. not least the cease-fire in the middle east that broke out this evening, which we will be getting a live report on from richard engel in gaza in just a couple of minutes. but i'm also thankful tonight to be able to report that the election has finally concluded in arizona, where it took them 14 days to count votes and announce the results this year. in the end, it turns out that all three competitive congressional races in that state went to the democrats. but the competitive u.s. senate race for republican jon kyl's old seat, that seat stayed republican. and yes, the county sheriff who did the whole taxpayer-funded stunt about having his cold case posse uncover the fraud of president obama's birth certificate, that sheriff did get re-elected, barely. last time he won by a 13-point landslide. this time he won by much less than th
, decline in manufacturing eased a little bit more than expected in november. joining us, chief european economist. ricar ricardo, thanks for joining us. so still a negative territory. what does this point to in terms of the economic decline for the fourth quarter? >> i think it's in line with the idea that real sgchlt dp will decline by at least 0.2%, possibly 0.3%. it will give us a negative entry point in 2013 when i expect an average growth of minus 0.2%. so still moderately recession territory. >> the german flash composite pmi 47.9, services 48, manufacturing 46.8, is germany -- we just saw the 0.2% print. is girl aermany going to have a negative contract? >> i'm looking for a contraction of minus 0.2. so only aed modest one. i expect activity will stabilize in q1 of next year, but obviously that requires a favorable external environment, meaning u.s. not going into this deep due to the fiscal cliff. and also signs of improvement in asia. >> meanwhile the french pmi says the survey there suggests a 0.7% gdp drop in quarter 4 for france. >> that seems quite large. we've seen in rece
use. now i'm going to introduce this amazing panel. first we have just to my right mia from sealtion. she is going to explain more about this term that was used a lot today and social literacy or social emotional learning. alice con is from cartoon network. dave steer to her right is from facebook and next to him is officer holly lawrence, sunny valley of public safety, digital safety program and she's going to talk about which is a powerful thing going national. and next -- is brian here? no. okay. all right. so we're all set and mia i would like you to enlighten us more in all that you're doing in social emotional learning. >> sure. i had some slides but i'm not sure -- no, we have a handout that went around to you and more detail about what social emotional learning is because i think we rise a little bit today and i came from seattle and i know many people have brought up that term today and i get the sense from this group that you're at kind of a high level of discourse and you have a general understanding. could i see a show of hands for those of you that social emotiona
d71658 ly 70 years ago. >>> christianity teaches us forgiveness, and second chances. i'm not saying i'll be perfect, that nobody who received clemency will ever do nothing wrong. i'm not infallible and nobody else is, but i am very comfortable and totally at peace with these pardons. >> jennifer: that's former mississippi governor haley barbour, defending his con trover shall decision to hand down 200 pardons. i too am a strong believer in second chances, and when i was governor of michigan i issued orders for nearly 200 which is the state record. toni bunton is one of the people i felt deserved a second chance. she spent more than 16 years behind bars for her part in a drug deal that ended in murder but in 2009 after a lot of deliberation i decided to free toni from her 25 to 50-year sentence. and tonight toni is joining us from detroit. toni welcome inside "the war room." >> thank you for inviting me. >> jennifer: so tell us what have you been doing since your sentence was commuted? >> i graduated from the university of michigan with a master'
protect u.s. personnel. >> the president has been skipping his daily intelligence briefings. >> with respect to iran i want to see a diplomatic resolution to the problem. >> the president's iran policy lacks credibility. the question is whether or not is whether the defense budget is big enough to deal with the major crisis and potential challenges around the world. >> as far as the middle east is concerned, his national policy has been abysmal failure. >> the arrogance and dishonesty is breathtaking. >> there is a circle the wagon operation around barack obama that nobody is going to penetrate. >> very close con tackle with countries like turkey and jordan that immediately border syria and obviously israel which is having already grave concerns as we do about movements of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere. >> are we better off in the middle east now than we were four years ago? absolutely not. why? because the policies of the administration and the way its been handling itself. >> when a president of the united states apologizes to religious fan
us? we been halted by the long, but this time of what to document every step of the way. one of my triplet sons was taken out of football because of concussions years ago. now knowing what i know, the game can be made safer. the game is being made safer. so very quickly what we did is we parachuted into oklahoma. we've been following 18 for the entire season. we started in february at each monthly visit them for a week. we've been filming them. their concussion rate has plummeted to we put together our risk management program, 15 different steps. we have a celeron matters, hit sensors on their helmet at the high school level, so we are tracking heads. we are tracking everything that these boys walk we been able to get them. no helmets, not just a correct fit but how to measure it. most import message i have is that the kids want these ether and their helmet or as an earbud or mouthpiece. they want that responsibility taken away from themselves. so right now they are underreported and this this is really helping. >> let me bring bill maher to this conversation. as we mentioned as an
-fired power plants generating electricity in the u.s., and those plants produce 130 million tons of waste called coal ash. it contains concentrations of mercury, arsenic, lead, and other toxic materials. and as lesley stahl first reported in 2009, when coal ash is dumped into wet ponds--and there are more than 500 of those across the country-- the result can have an enormous health risk on the people living in nearby communities. >> we get about 48%, nearly half of the electricity in this country from coal. >> jim roewer is one of the top lobbyists for the power industry. >> coal is going to be around for a long time. >> and we really can't get rid of coal. >> we shouldn't get rid of coal. >> well, should or shouldn't, we can't, and coal makes waste. would you say that the industry has done a good job of disposing of the coal ash waste? >> we can do better. >> does that mean no? >> well, we had a kingston spill. >> that's kingston, tennessee, where, in december 2008, a giant retention pool of coal ash buckled under the weight of five decades of waste. >> all the power lines have been knoc
reaffirmed egypt's commitment to the palestinian cause and a need for just resolution. u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton helped negotiate the deal. she promised to work with partners in the region. the israeli military killed about 160 palestinians during the conflict. palestinian militants fired rockets from the gaza strip that killed five israelis. prime minister netanyahu said the right thing is to reach a lasting cease-fire but he warned of a wider military operation if security was threatened. hamas leader mashau warned his forces would resume attacks if israel broke the truce. >>> people in jerusalem are wondering if the cease-fire will hold. cohey sue gee has covered the middle east for years. he was in gaza on the first day of the offensive. kohei, why did the two sides agree to this truce? >> reporter: well, thousands of rockets have been fired since israeli forces withdrew from gaza in 2005. the israelis seemed to have come to the conclusion that they succeed the in reducing the ability of hamas to attack. and i think the influence of the u.s. contributed to bringing a
, and yet there are virtues that flow within the current of all of our lives that connect us, and surely chief among them is forgiveness. if we have the capacity to forgive, then we have reason for hope. palestinians and israelis who must at times feel they have not one thing in common they are feeling the exact same thing, hope that thesis -- the creasefire holds, and as connected as we all are we hope right along with them. [♪ theme music ♪] >> jennifer: we are in "the war room," but there is good news out of the middle east tonight, which is that the region is calm for the first time in eight days. there are no rocket blasts piercing the quiet night. there are no missiles streaking across the sky mother on both sides of the border can look up at the same bright star and breathe just a little bit easy ere because their children are safe. hamas and israel have agreed to a ceasefire for the moment. each side launched about 1500 strikes, and there were violent protests in the west bank in which one palestinian was killed. the final straw was the bombing of a c
everybody, i'm angela miles, and thank you for joining us on today's first business. coming up in this edition, we are getting into the spirit of giving by checking in on charities. how americans are opening up their wallets, and why some nonprofits are facing a new dilemma. plus, we'll take a look at the advances parents are making to help their children become financially savvy. college costs continue to soar. our guest is dishing out tips on cutting the expense. why he says you don't have to be at the top of your class to find a top scholarship. and, let the holiday movie season commence. a review of some of the biggest and smallest flicks to hit the big screen in the coming months. nonprofit organizations are facing a big dilemna: many of their donors are elderly, in poor health and there are fewer of them each year, and there aren't enough new donors to pick up the slack. in our cover story, how one non-profit is using business strategies to make a difference. the privately-funded pritzker military library is one of chicago's best-kept secrets. "our biggest problem is no o
shows distribution, most of us in here. you get anybody out here who is externalizing or anyone out here who is internalizing, as a psychologist, we try to bring them back in here so they're more healthy. that's what we study. when you're having problems in your life or any other area, if we can do something, talking to you versus talk therapy or medicine that might help you, what we're trying to do is get everybody back here so we're just kind of more balanced. with respect to the traumatic brain injuries and other types of things, that's much simpler for people to kind of understand that you had a concussive event or you had a t.b.i., traumatic brain injury, that's caused problems. we should be developing ways of helping to manage and treat those problems just like we do individuals who have the other types of problems. >> let me just add one thing there, which is it's a good question, but it highlights one of the challenges of introducing neuroscience today in the courtroom. at kent showed you some of his slides and mentioned during his talk, he is trying to develop treatments as he d
for us to commit resources as a city is really important. and what i understand of this item is that there is a discussion about whether or not to tie the funding that's underlying this item to the rainy day fund. and to the extent that happens, to the extent that there is a connection between this appropriation and the rainy day fund, i will not support it. the rainy day fund was created for the very purpose of this city making public education a priority. the rainy day fund, as was enacted by the board of supervisors, as was crafted by then supervisor ammiano has to stand on its own terms, it has its own triggers, its own mechanisms for deciding what exactly the school district gets. and to the extent that we are trying to use this supplemental appropriation as a09( #ta way of minimizing the amount given to the school district through the rainy day fund i have a problem with that. so to the extent that this item comes back to us in the form where it is tied to the rainy day fund, i will not be supporting it, and i would encourage parents and folks in the public school commu
about this story. we have jackie joining us "right this minute" from south africa. how are you? more importantly, how is your hair holding up? >> luckily, one of my friends is an amazing hairdresser and he gave it a good chock and conditioning and i will live toñ tale another ta tell another tale. >> did you feel heat? >> i was so engrossed in what i was doing, i didn't. >> how much hair did you end up losing? >> i would say a good chunk. but it needed a trim. >> how did the bride handle this, that you got a lot of attention on her special day? good laugh about it. you don't see, okay, sort of thing, enjoy the rest of her wedding. >> did the d.j. play "this girl is on fire" by alicia keys. ♪ >> did you get more business because of this? >> i have had a lot of people contacting me. i've put myself in extreme situations. one of many memorable occasionsñ >> it's officially the season of the turkey. i think at this çóhouse, everyd is turkey season. see that big giant turkey at the front stoop of this house? giant turkey does not like visitors. this is a watchdog turkey, if you will
the mosque. that is considered a terrorist organization by the u.s. government, of course. >> i want to thank president morsi for his leadership in ending the violent, this is a critical moment for the region. egypt a new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership that has long made this country a cornerstone of regional stabilitiy it peace. lou: the ceasefire hours after a bomb tow through a bus in israel's defense ministry in tel aviv, it injured at least 2 dozen people, hamas leaders praised the attack but did not take out right responsibility. a damascus based group with ties to the west bank took credit. the israeli government confirmed this is only the first stage of a ceasefire agreement work many questions remain stock answered. a second set of negotiations reportedly to begin within the next 24 hours, israel's blockade of the gaza border, and an end to the flow of arms in to gaza to be negotiated. but perhaps, a bigger question, did secretary of state, hillary clinton, simply rubber-stamp an agreement that has already been negotiated. we take all of this up here tonight
. this is the land use and economic development committee of the san francisco board of supervisors. my name is eric mar, i'm the chair of the committee. to my left is supervisor scott wiener. supervisor maly a cohen is absent today. our clerk is derek evans. mr. evans, can you please give us the announcements? >> yes. please make sure all electronic devices are off, copies submitted to the clerk. items acted upon today will appear on december 4, 2012 san francisco board of supervisors agenda unless stated. >> thank you. we have six items on the agenda today. but i've been notified by supervisor olague, item number 5, she has urged us to continue that to item on the call of the chair. that is the resolution to remove all management proposals and activities derived from the sharp park conceptual restoration alternatives report's alternative a18 from the environmental impact report for the san francisco recreation and park department's significant natural resource areas management plan, and to consider proposals and alternatives for the future of sharp park golf course through a separate and complete
. the 6.7 million that is allocated for this project, 22% is going to be used for pilot project for the free muni for youth. the other 76%'s going to be used for maintenance. i don't know why. supervisor scott wiener is youth. this is something that we should consider as an important issue for our community. looking at the demographics, in terms of people opposing this project, just white women, rich, and majority of people of low income folks here, they support this project. i don't believe that this is something that is unsustainable. i think that the equity is there. there is funding for it. it's a pilot project that we can go forward and have it move -- be implemented. my last thing is that we should change the way we think in this city. this city is for everybody. we have to recognize san francisco values. we have to support everyone, not just blacks, latinos, asians, lives here. the way the debate was going, it's so racist and prejudicial. we have to stop the discrimination thing in the ci city. >> supervisor wiener: is there any additional public comment? okay. mr. chairm
new hybrid buses that will be coming to us this spring, an exceptionally fast procurement cycle by previous standards. thanks to john haley's leadership, to significantly streamline that process and get those buses much sooner than we would have otherwise. he also have -- you also have approved contract for rehab of a bunch of our existing buses in addition to the lrv fleet we have programmed which i'll speak about in a moment. in these overhaul projects we're identifying the components on the vehicles that are the most prone to failure, getting them replaced or rehabilitated. the results so far, the ones that come out of rehab for backup, for lack of a better term, perform much better than the rest of the group which has direct impact on the performance of the system. and the new buses you approved were hybrid buses. we have trolley bus procurement coming right on the heels of that. estate division as well as with the union on making sure we have adequate restroom facilities for operators. it may seem not very much related, but having decent, clean, safe rrmt restrooms for r op
i'm morley safer. thanks for joining us. [ticking] >> banks were filing foreclosure lawsuits by the millions, and in the rush to collect, it appeared some financial firms were using phony legal documents to throw people out of their homes. chris pendley says he forged 4,000 bogus mortgage documents a day for major u.s. banks. and your previous experience in banking? >> none. [ticking] >> it started out as a mortgage crisis. then it slowly evolved into a credit crisis. now it's something entirely different and much more serious. >> this is a full-blown financial storm and one that comes around perhaps one every 50 or 100 years. this is the real thing. >> and much of what went wrong on wall street could be traced back to something called "credit default swaps." they were traded in a risky shadow market, and they were at the heart of the financial meltdown. [ticking] >> it has tentacles as wide as anything i've seen. i think, next to housing, this is the single most important issue in the united states and certainly the largest threat to the u.s. economy. >> meredith whitney was
, extends everything for a year, and then gives us six months in which to reform entitlements and reform taxes and reduce the debt. are you kidding me?! push the pause button? we already pushed the pause button in 2011. these representatives were sent back to washington to get something done now. in fact, pushing the pause button could destroy america's credit rating and further harm the economy. mark zandi, chief economist at moody's analytics says, "if we can kick the can, at some point moody's is going to downgrade. you're going to create more instability in the financial markets." zandi said it would be better to do nothing than to create an extension. republicans and some centrist democrats are definitely not getting the message. when the president won re-election, he said his number one priority is to reach an economic deal by reaching across both sides of the aisle. >> i want to be clear. i'm not wedding to every detail of my plan. i'm open to compromise. i'm open to new ideas. i'm committed to solving our fiscal challenges. but i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced.
, will the celebrations ends and the fear return? for u.s. secretary of state hilary clinton and president morsi, the hope is that the deal will stick. it calls for freedom of movement for palestinians in and out of gaza and a commitment not to target militants and commitment from militant groups in gaza, to halt rocket fire into israel. again, a discussion nothing is a done deal. over the next hour, we'll look at negotiations still happening now, we'll also hear from the spokeswoman for the israeli defense forces and the leader much hamas. plus, a reporter on the ground and whole lot more. we begin with a look at what has transpired over the last 24 hours, and it's remarkable there is a cease-fire at this hour when you consider how this wednesday started off. take a look. at mid day, no sign of a truce when a city bus is bombed in tell aviv, two dozen people twounded. terrorists left two bombs on the bus and fled. only one exploded. hamas praised attack, near the headquarters of the israeli defense forces. farther south, an israeli home hit by a rocket. room after room, left in ruins. according to the is
i'm steve kroft. thanks for joining us. [ticking] [ticking] >> it is the mark of the yakuza: ornate, full-body tattoos that cover the members of the japanese mob. so how did one of their most notorious godfathers get into america and jump to the front of a line for a lifesaving liver transplant? this reporter found out and says it may cost him his life. >> as he was leaving and getting in his car, he said, "that"-- you know, "that--that goddamn american jew reporter. i want to kill him." [ticking] >> greg mortenson's book three cups of tea is a publishing phenomenon that has made him a celebrity, a cult-like figure on the lecture circuit, and inspired people to give nearly $60 million to his charity, and it all began with one simple story. >> it's a beautiful story, and it's a lie. >> we wanted to talk to mortenson about that and some other things, but he didn't want to talk to 60 minutes. >> steve kroft. >> nice to meet you. >> how you doing? >> thanks. >> got five minutes for us today? >> um... [ticking] >> we wondered how the man who could whistle up a corporate jet on a whim...
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